Archive for ‘adaptations’

February 3, 2015

A return visit from George O’Connor and the Olympians!

Come hang out with George O’Connor and his Olympians, Thursday Feb 5th at 7:30 in the kids room at the Takoma Park Maryland Library.  He’s introducing Ares: Bringer of War, the newest in his Olympians series.

Talk process, research,  story, characters, etc. with the artist.  Plus he can sign for you, as our friends at Politics and Prose will be selling books on site.

All the gods, in one panoramic class picture.

All the gods, in one panoramic class picture.

 

George O’Connor broke into daylight with his graphic  non-fiction work Journey into Mohawk Country, (First Second Press, 2006).  Set in the 1600’s this meticulously researched book illustrated the journal entries of a 23 year old Dutchman who attempted to make contact with the Mohawk and Oneida  tribes northwest of Albany in order to establish better trading relations.

The wry humor of O’Connor’s pen animated the dry prose of this travel diary and brought to life what must have been a mind-expanding life-changing journey for the author.  In reading a fairly bland account O’Connor recognized the drama and absurdity of these three young men who sorta stumbled and blustered their way through the wilderness — despite being basically unprepared and armored chiefly with good-natured ignorance.

This love of history as a living thing serves O’Connor  well in his retellings of the tales of the Hellenic deities.  Projected to be a twelve issue series, these books depict the greater figures among the gods of ancient Greece.  Faithful to the mythology, O’Connor nevertheless finds new angles to tell these stories, often from the perspective of the gods themselves.

The art is bright, clear, pastel colors and whimsical line.  Dialogue is modern,  but only rarely with a jarring anachronistic phrase (and hey, they’re immortal gods, clearly they can transcend time and learn a phrase or two  from another era).  Kids who discover the Greek gods via Rick Riordan’s  ‘Percy Jackson and the Olympians’ series, will get a good dose of the real thing in these slim light volumes.

O’Connor also gives a peep into his methodology in the back of each book, discussing various aspects of each myth, things he discovered in research, challenges of drawing certain characters,  illustrating some difficulties or victories in his process.  These paragraphs are as valuable as the rest of the book in teaching kids how the study of history can be approached as an opportunity for adventure and discovery.

Pretty good,  each of them, a useful add to any library collection.  Some volumes are in our All-ages collection, others promote themselves to our young adult shelves because, well you know, these Greeks did not always behave themselves all that well.

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January 27, 2014

A visit with George O’Connor and various Greek Gods.

Come hang out with George O’Connor and his Olympians, Wednesday evening at 7:30 in the kids room at the Takoma Park Maryland Library.   Talk process, research,  story, characters, etc. with the artist.  Plus he can sign for you, as our friends at Politics and Prose will be selling books on site.

All the gods, in one panoramic class picture.

All the gods, in one panoramic class picture.

 

George O’Connor broke into daylight with his graphic  non-fiction work Journey into Mohawk Country, (First Second Press, 2006).  Set in the 1600’s this meticulously researched book illustrated the journal entries of a 23 year old Dutchman who attempted to make contact with the Mohawk and Oneida  tribes northwest of Albany in order to establish better trading relations.

The wry humor of O’Connor’s pen animated the dry prose of this travel diary and brought to life what must have been a mind-expanding life-changing journey for the author.  In reading a fairly bland account O’Connor recognized the drama and absurdity of these three young men who sorta stumbled and blustered their way through the wilderness — despite being basically unprepared and armored chiefly with good-natured ignorance.

This love of history as a living thing serves O’Connor  well in his retellings of the tales of the Hellenic deities.  Projected to be a twelve issue series, these books depict the greater figures among the gods of ancient Greece.  Faithful to the mythology, O’Connor nevertheless finds new angles to tell these stories, often from the perspective of the gods themselves.

The art is bright, clear, pastel colors and whimsical line.  Dialogue is modern,  but only rarely with a jarring anachronistic phrase (and hey, they’re immortal gods, clearly they can transcend time and learn a phrase or two  from another era).  Kids who discover the Greek gods via Rick Riordan’s  ‘Percy Jackson and the Olympians’ series, will get a good dose of the real thing in these slim light volumes.

O’Connor also gives a peep into his methodology in the back of each book, discussing various aspects of each myth, things he discovered in research, challenges of drawing certain characters,  illustrating some difficulties or victories in his process.  These paragraphs are as valuable as the rest of the book in teaching kids how the study of history can be approached as an opportunity for adventure and discovery.

Pretty good,  each of them, a useful add to any library collection.  Some volumes are in our All-ages collection, others promote themselves to our young adult shelves because, well you know, these Greeks did not always behave themselves all that well.

November 4, 2013

Gareth Hinds at the Takoma Park Maryland Library, Thurs 11/7. 7:30 PM

Local comics artist Gareth Hinds sits to discuss various projects, his process, etc.  Signing his latest: Romeo & Juliet. Thurs 11/7,  7:30PM in the Childrens’ room.  101 Philadelphia Ave. Takoma Park MD 20912

garethromeocover
Librarians discovered Gareth Hinds in the guise of his shuffling slouching inky and murderous monster Grendel.  Hinds’ 2007 interpretation of the Beowulf saga won fans and strong reviews with his lush and muscular reworking of the hero’s tale.  His Grendel steals the show from the title character though, leaving his greasy imprint and bloody footsteps through out the first half of the story.

garethhinds1
Beautifully painted, rich in color and mood, Beowulf became a must-have for public libraries, with a story strong enough to capture the interest of reluctant readers, (with plenty of gore and conflict) yet adding the gravitas of classic literature to the collection.  It is the broccoli of the library shelves: it’s good for you!  And if mom makes you eat it, hey, it can be pretty good!  If you add some of this to your plate mom might let you also have some (modern era) superheroes as well.

Subsequently Mr Hinds has adapted The Odyssey, King Lear, The Merchant of Venice, and now Shakespeare’s iconic tragic love story.  He’s now working on Shakespeare’s ‘Scottish Play’.  Come talk with him about process, materials, inspirations etc. — in our Children’s room at 7:30, Thursday 11/7.  Our friends at Politics and Prose will be selling books if you want a signed copy.

 

 

October 6, 2010

The Little Prince, adapted by Joann Sfar

This adaptation is faithful to the original, and though it’s tricky to adapt a book whose illustrations were so much a part of the charm, Msr. Sfar manages that aspect artfully.

Still I found the story lost some of it’s dreamlike quality in the translation from word to image.   Though Msr. Sfar’s illustrations are always charming in and of themselves,  here his occasional loopy exuberance or earthy humor was constrained to remain faithful to the ethereal quality of this classic.  For Msr. Sfar’s best work see his luminous and wry The Rabbi’s Cat and it’s even-better sequel.  Though this was not his best work  he doesn’t do the book any ill either.

I liked the adaptation, but it doesn’t stay with me and reoccur at odd moments of the day the way the original did.   Here’s one way to describe the difference, when I was a kid reading the book, or having it read to me as a bedtime story I found myself worrying about the prince and his flower and even perhaps crying a bit.   Now the characters on the page may cry instead. There’s a distance from the poignance.  Or maybe I’m merely older now.  Maybe not.  I think I remember misting up a little in reading the Rabbi’s Cat Two.

Ultimately I’d sum  it up like this:  I suppose it says something about the genius of St Exupery’s work that even an artist as stellar as Msr Sfar cannot improve upon it.

Still a nice little book.